• sicilian wines of etna
  • sicilian wines of etna
  • sicilian wines of etna
  • sicilian wines of etna
  • sicilian wines of etna
  • sicilian wines of etna
  • sicilian wines of etna

The Subzones

Tenuta delle Terre Nere owns vineyards in four crus – Calderara Sottana, Santo Spirito, Guardiola and Feudo di Mezzo. Ever since the first vintage (2002) it vinifies, ages, bottles and labels its crus accordingly. The first estate to believe in the importance of expressing the character of each cru in its purity. All of our properties are located on the northern slopes of the volcano, in the townships of Castiglione di Sicilia and Randazzo. More precisely between 600 and 900 metres above sea level in the “belt” that extends from the village of Solicchiata to the town of Randazzo, the area traditionally recognized as the very finest of the entire appellation for Nerello Mascalese. If one finds the analogy between the Etna and Burgundy acceptable, then these slopes would undoubtedly be the Côte d’Or of the Etna. In 2005, when our estate was member of the Board of Directors of the Consortium of the Etna D.O.C., we began our crusade to formally define the borders of traditionally designated crus, (locally known as Contrade). This in order to allow what the statute of the Etna D.O.C. had provided for at art. 7: namely, that the wines of Etna could rightfully enrich their labels with the crus that so powerfully characterize their identity. That right was negated by a comma of a Ministerial decree in 1991. Finally, in 2012 the Ministry of Agriculture approved our sub-zoning of the most significant townships of the D.O.C., an operation done by means of the reestablishment of the historical boundaries of the Contrade. I have no hesitation in defining the achievement of historic significance for the appellation. Not only has it reinstated and classified identities that had traditionally been accepted for centuries. It has laid the foundations upon which future generations, strong of a deeper experience, may define and circumscribe still more complex subdivisions, breaking down the just established crus into fractions whose boundaries we can sometimes already gleam. And sooner or later we will also come to identify and classify a qualitative hierarchy to which tradition, albeit imprecisely, testifies. Just as Burgundy can proudly display its tantalizing variations of Pinot Noir, so the Etna will now be able to offer the subtle nuances of its Nerello Mascalese. And here I wish to graciously thank the colleagues and friends that stood behind us, and with their support, were instrumental to the achievement. Important results are already easily seen, as virtually every newly established estate proudly bears its crus on their labels.